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CLINICAL SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 240-249

Subgingival temperature: A forgotten cardinal sign of gingival inflammation


1 Department of Periodontology, Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Dhirendra Kumar Singh
Department of Periodontology, Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar - 751 024, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJAM.IJAM_147_20

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The first information since the 2nd century Anno Domini (AD) – when Celsius proposes “calor” (temperature) as one of the cardinal sign of inflammation, Cornelius Celsius, a nonmedico Roman from the first century, who was the first to describe the features of inflammation-redness, swelling, heat, and pain. Of all the cardinal signs of inflammation, the temperature is the only one that can be measured quantitatively and objectively. Furthermore, periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease and should manifest an increase in temperature in the diseased periodontium. The most challenging task in doing the diagnosis and treatment planning periodontal diseases is to predict which periodontal site the disease activity will increase. The routine clinical diagnostic parameters used for predicting and assessing periodontal disease activity are less reliable in predicting disease activity at particular sites. Periodontal pocket depth measurement is inherently inadequate because it fails to distinguish between active and inactive gingival and periodontal disease. Subgingival temperature is a more reproducible method for diagnosing periodontal disease activity, which has been forgotten by clinicians and has formed the concept for this scientific review. The following core competencies are addressed in this article: Medical knowledge, Patient care.


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